Exhibits at The Glass Room London

…provocative artworks that play with the use and abuse of data in our world
Hyperallergic

What is personal data in an age where data is everything but personal? The Glass Room is a space for reflection, experimentation and play that provides different ways of understanding how technologies and data are changing our lives. The Glass Room puts big data on display in ways that make it tangible and less abstract. What does your data say about you, and how is it being used to define you? What do you give up in exchange? How are data and technology changing the personal, professional and social fabric of all of our lives? The Data Detox Bar is where you can get one-to-one advice and simple tips and tricks on how to protect your privacy online and reclaim your digital self. Our staff of Ingeniuses are on hand to answer your questions about the exhibits, talk to you about the issues they raise, and give you practical advice to help you make informed choices about what you do with your data. The Glass Room is presented by Mozilla and curated by Tactical Tech. Mozilla is the not-for-profit behind the Firefox web browser and uses technology, products and advocacy to make the internet healthier so it’s easy to access, safe to use, and empowers everyone, everywhere. Tactical Tech is a Berlin-based non-profit organisation working at the intersection of technology, human rights and civil liberties. Tactical Tech provides trainings, conducts research and creates cultural interventions that contribute to the wider socio-political debate around digital security, privacy and the fair use of data. The Glass Room unfolds in four thematic sections, each of which explores a different aspect of our digital world:

SOMETHING TO HIDE
What does it mean when we say we have ‘nothing to hide’? Our most intimate data, when it is aggregated into data sets and mined for patterns, is also tech companies’ most valuable asset. We want to discover and broadcast what makes us unique individuals when we share our likes and dislikes, our daily habits and activities, our tastes and interests, but the companies harvesting our data would rather turn us into types and profiles to be traded and learned from. The projects displayed here present more speculative and playful ways of visualising the uses and misuses of our data. You are invited to experiment and reconsider the idea that even if we think we might have nothing to hide, we should at least understand what we’re not hiding.

Explore Featured Exhibits in The Glass Room
Forgot Your Password?
Even if you think your password is unique, according to a 2019 survey by the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre, “123456” is the most commonly use...
MegaPixels
Is that you? MegaPixels uses a custom built facial recognition system to search for your face amongst the millions of images used for training faci...
Data Production Labour
Social media platforms can use technology to turn your interactions into valuable data that can help boost their profits. Data Production Labor ask...
Unfit Bits
Who are you really working for when you work out? The information your Fitbit collects about you is not only valuable to you alone. Your doctor or ...
Where The F***k was I?
Your phone can keep your memories much better and for much longer than you can. From June 2010 to April 2011 James Bridle, and anyone else with an ...
Online Shopping Center
What do you think about an online shopping service that sends products to your home before you have even ordered them? In 2014, Amazon was granted ...
Ashley Madison Angels at Work in London
Millions of users looking to have extramarital affairs had their data exposed when the infidelity website Ashley Madison was hacked in 2015. The ha...
The Listener
What does your data sound like? Our smartphones, laptops and tablets are constantly openly broadcasting their unique identification signals to near...
Smell Dating
Tired of endlessly swiping through no-matches on dating apps? Are you over the back-and-forth messaging that leads nowhere? Smell Dating is a new k...

WE KNOW YOU
Initially branded as disruptive upstarts, the five companies that have come to be known as GAFAM (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft) have become some of the biggest companies in the world and have amassed the largest shares of our data. These tech giants have made themselves indispensable in our lives, providing services that are as valuable as basic utilities. Collectively, they now wield an unprecedented level of power and influence that stretches across all aspects of our lives, from work to home to leisure. How many of their services do you rely on? And how much do these companies know about you? Each of the exhibits at this table explores a different way in which tech companies and the people who run them have become engrained in our lives. They know us, but how much do we really know about them?

Explore Featured Exhibits in The Glass Room
The Alphabet Empire
When we think about the slogan, ‘One account. All of Google’, just how much information is in that ‘One account’. What exactly constitutes ‘All of ...
Amazon Futures
How can companies like Amazon continue to satisfy our love affair with online shopping? The models displayed here are based on Amazon patent applic...
Fertility Chip
Remote-control birth control may be the wave of the future. In 2012, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gave a grant of nearly £8 million to Mic...
The Zuckerberg House
In 2010, Mark Zuckerberg – the founder of Facebook – claimed the age of privacy was over. A couple of years later, Zuckerberg paid over $40 million...
Apple Towers
This year, Apple Inc. became number 3 on the Fortune 500 behind only Exxon Mobil and Walmart. This 3D infographic contrasts its wealth accumulated ...
Reconnaissance
What do satellites see? Ingrid Burrington’s lenticular prints show data centres, air force bases and other politically sensitive sites as they are ...
Newstweek
Do your friends and colleagues complain that media coverage is too boring/depressing/celebrity-laden/happy? With the Newstweek, you can be a master...
Tor Access Point
Do you want to see deeper inside the web? Visit the dark net, courtesy of !Mediengruppe Bitnik. You don’t have to install anything, just connect to...
Facebook Algorithmic Factory
This graph is based on Share Lab‘s ongoing investigations into the machinations of the world‘s largest social network. From left to right, it maps ...
Data Elephant
Data Elephant is an evolving commentary on personal data, permission and exploitation. The soundscape creates a warm texture of corporate invitatio...

BIG MOTHER
We often hear the ominous phrase ‘Big Brother is watching you’, but what about when the state is keeping track of your actions under the guise of a more nurturing figure, more akin to ‘Big Mother’ looking after your well-being? When governments use tracking technology to provide aid to refugees or when companies promote constant surveillance to ensure that your elderly relatives are receiving proper care, how do we weigh the risks versus the rewards of these technological solutions? These digital technologies promise to make our lives more efficient; at the same time, they normalise the use of surveillance in our everyday lives – we risk becoming both the surveilled and the surveyors. When methods of tracking are not transparent or visible, how can we ‘opt out’? What are the trade-offs when we give up our privacy or autonomy for safety and efficiency? How can we regain some agency to act independently in a world where we are increasingly and indiscriminately being monitored?

Explore Featured Exhibits in The Glass Room
Silver Mother™
 
Silver Mother™ is a product that allows you to monitor your elderly relatives without having to be there in person. By installing motion sensors on...
How Long Does It Take to Read Amazon Kindle's Terms and Conditions?
When you buy a new digital service, do you read the terms and conditions before clicking ‘I agree’? How long do you think it would it take if you d...
Iris Scanning
This promotional video illustrates how the UNHCR and the private company IrisGuard have collaborated to implement iris scanning – the unique identi...
23andMe
For £149 and a vial of your saliva, 23andMe will analyse your DNA and send you a full report about your family history and your risk of developing ...
Lenddo
 
Would you be willing to trade access to your social media and browsing history in exchange for a credit score? In order to assign credit scores to ...
The Device Graph
 
Have you ever wondered how the ads that pop up on your devices seem to read your mind? That’s because marketing companies are constantly using your...
Cubic
Do you want the data about your daily Tube ride to be collected by a company that is also a major contractor for the United States’ armed services?...
UK Census and Lockheed Martin
The F-117A Night Hawk – also known as the ‘Stealth Fighter’ for its ability to evade radar detection – was built by the secretive Skunk Works divis...
The Border Interfaced
What if you could help fight crime from your computer at home? Texas Virtual BorderWatch was a public-private partnership between the start-up Blue...

DATA DETOX BAR

Explore Featured Exhibits in The Glass Room
Data Detox Bar
At the Data Detox Bar, you are invited to explore the inside of the online world. Visit the Alternative App Centre to get open-source tools and ser...

OPEN THE BOX
Have you ever wondered what your data looks like from the other side–what cellphone providers, internet providers or websites can see about you andy our preferences and habits as you use their services? If so, take a look at these short, soundless animations showing a bird’s eye view of what data is collected, by who and how. Some of the animations look at the data traces we leave behind when we use digital devices moving around the city or a physical space, some look at how our work and life patterns can be seen from our online data traces as we browse the web,send emails or use social media sites, and others look at how our data is bought, sold, analyzed and utilized and how it begins to shape the societies we live within.

Explore Featured Exhibits in The Glass Room
Citizen Ex
Every time you go online, you are connected through servers in different countries and jurisdictions. These virtual journeys are tracked, and your ...
Confessions of a Data Broker
The buying, selling and analysing of our data is a massive industry, yet it is one we don’t know much about. Who are data brokers and how do they o...
Data Anonymization
How many times have companies claimed that they will anonymise your data? The suggestion of anonymisation is that it will promise us privacy if we ...
IC Watch
IC WatchMany of us use social networking sites to find new jobs, get new clients or build new business relationships. In doing so, we share a lot o...
Inside Hacking Team
We often hear about metadata – that is, data about data. Apart from the content of your communications, metadata can reveal what we are doing, with...
Living with Algorithms: Why should you care about algorithms?
‘Algorithm’ is a buzzword that is used to explain everything from big data to machine learning. This animation unpicks why we should care about alg...
Re:Log
Whenever we can, we join free WiFi networks to get online when we are on the move. This animation – based on data gathered from a conference held i...
Serious Profiling
If you use a smartphone, you have on online profile. Do you have one or many? Are you in control of your profile? Is it based on information you ar...
The Monitored Life Of National Councilor Balthasar Glättli
As we go about our daily lives, we generate all kinds of information through our smart phones, all of which can disclose insights into our actions,...
The Scoring Society
From Dave Eggers’ The Circle to Charlie Brooker’s Black Mirror, fiction writers are beginning to paint a nightmarish scenario for us of the ‘scorin...
Trackography
Whenever you browse a website, someone is looking over your shoulder. Almost every site visit is tracked by a third-party that shares and sometimes...
Data and Elections
How can our data be used by political parties to influence us? Even information we think of as anonymous - like what magazine we subscribe to or wh...
Browser Histories
The algorithms that control the devices that make up the Internet of Things - in our homes and our cities - need to be trained to ‘understand‘ us. ...
Data and the Home
The algorithms that control the devices that make up the Internet of Things - in our homes and our cities - need to be trained to ‘understand‘ us. ...
Data and Dating
When you join a dating website or download a dating app, you volunteer information about yourself in hopes of finding a good match. But all these i...